Great News! Spend $125 and get free shipping! 

Chinese Wild Yam- Seeking the

Seeking the "Light" Plant

December 01, 2016

At a certain point every autumn, one experiences the light receding.  I notice it when I have to turn on the “headlights” on my bicycle on the ride home after work.  Sometimes I notice that the growth of the garden plants slows to a crawl; other years I just notice a tendency to want to sleep more and be less active.  In any case, the cause is very clear: the light is receding and the darkness is growing. 
 
This experience, of course, is one of the meanings of both the Christmas and Hanukah stories, both of which teach us about overcoming the darkness both within and outside of us.   As we approach the darkness this year, I would like to introduce you to an interesting plant that Rudolf Steiner claimed could support light processes in the human being.  Before getting into the details of the plant, we could ask, what is meant by light processes in the human being, and what does it look like when a human being is deficient in light.
 
In my new book Human Heart, Cosmic Heart, I question the accuracy of the current model that explains the function of our nervous system.   For me, the theory that ionic fluxes and the movement of neurotransmitters across synapses are the basis of nerve transmission is implausible, if for no other reason than it’s simply way too slow to account for the instantaneous functioning of our nervous system.

See also: https://www.drcowansgarden.com/blogs/news/a-thanksgiving-gratitude-how-the-heart-looks-out-for-us
 
To account for this instantaneous functioning, referred to as quantum coherence, we must look for some other mode of transmission than cumbersome chemicals.   The two obvious candidates are the flow of electrons or the flow of photons, i.e., light.  My guess, and it’s only a guess, is that the connections that are fundamental to any living being are a combination of both of these forces –- light and electricity.   In other words, as an intrinsic condition of health, we must have a robust flow of light throughout our nervous system.  In its absence, we suffer from one of the various neurological diseases, such as depression, sleeplessness or memory loss.  In fact, Steiner pointed out that a failing memory was the indication for the plant that would introduce light into the human being.
 
The plant I am referring to is the Chinese Wild Yam  (Dioscorea batatas), otherwise known in anthroposophical circles as “lightroot” (see photo above). The wild yam has many uses in traditional Chinese medicine, from kidney diseases to snake bites, probably because of its tonifying effects.  
 
The Dioscorea plant is a permaculture star as it’s an easy-to-grow, prolific source of nutrients and starch for just about any home garden.   We are actively looking for a farmer or large-scale gardener who is willing to grow this species for us to turn into powder. If you are such a person or know of anyone, please contact us.  

With joy and light for the holiday season, 
Tom Cowan, M.D.




Also in News

Trifling With Chia
Trifling With Chia

June 15, 2021

Trifling With Chia is perfect for those moments when you have decision fatigue. What should I eat? Trifle or chia? Now there’s no need to choose; you can enjoy the best of both puddings.

 

If I had my way, every dessert menu would be a tasting menu. I’d choose 3 or 4 plates without anyone batting an eyelid. But alas, that’s simply not your average dining experience. This recipe is for those who like to enjoy more than one delicious treat at a time, without feeling guilty. It’s guilt free and full of naturally raw, wild, and minimally processed ingredients like fiber-rich chia seeds, baruka nuts, beet powder, coconut butter, turmeric powder, bee pollen, cacao, and sweet spices like cinnamon and lucuma (optional). With a little ingenuity, you might be able to eat all the colors of the rainbow in one mouthful.

Read More

Ashitaba Creamy Green Goddess Dressing
Ashitaba Creamy Green Goddess Dressing

June 08, 2021

Homemade dressings are one of the easiest, and cost-effective ways to upgrade the nutrient content of any dish, such as a plate of cooked vegetables, crudité, or eggs. There’s little room for error if you follow one of the golden rules of cooking: taste as you go. This is one of the reasons why dressings will always be firm favorites in our household.

Read More

Preserving The Harvest
Preserving The Harvest

June 08, 2021

Rhubarb has been growing in wonderful abundance in our garden. One of the leaves is almost as big as my computer desk, and the stalks are bright red with a superb tartness. For this recipe, I am using maple syrup and lemon, and I will be freezing it for use later on this fall and winter. The early preservation recipes need to be quick and easy, since most of my time is absorbed by maintaining the garden and optimizing productivity.

Read More

Net Orders Checkout

Item Price Qty Total
Subtotal $ 0.00
Shipping
Total

Shipping Address

Shipping Methods